Crowds

In this current series I’m exploring the theme of crowd behaviour (and group processes). I want to examine this powerful phenomenon that has persisted through history and across cultures, as a scaffold for our making sense of the world, saying what counts, to understand our relation to others. In this series the crowd becomes a metaphor for loss of self, a feeling of belonging and an arena for the expression of our strongest emotions.

 

I’m less interested in the reasons for a crowd’s assembly or the aftermath of its activity. These paintings concentrate on the moment where, in the life cycle of the crowd, it has reached the point of maximum escalation. Physical contact, pressure, compression come together in the group to create an emergent sense of commonality which, at its most intense, challenges the boundaries of selfhood.

 

 

Perhaps it is only in the crowd that people cast off their petty day to day concerns and become subjects of history.

George Lefebvre

Threshold of One – oil on canvas – 48 x 48 inches

Madness and the Cure for Madness , oil on canvas , 32 x 40 inches

They Can Come Out and Join Us; Or They Can Be Fetched – oil on canvas – 48 x 48 inches

The Urge to Become Fire – oil on canvas – 48 x 72 inches

Stack Overflow – oil on canvas – 36 x 48 inches

Eruption – oil on canvas – 32 x 40 inches

Blue Communion – oil on canvas – 48 inches x 48 inches

Green Arena – oil on canvas – 48 x 36 inches

Midnight Mass – oil on canvas – 48 x 72 inches

Red Assembly – oil on mylar mounted on board – 25 x 35 inches

Sum of the Parts – oil on mylar mounted on board – 25 x 35 inches

Blue Assembly – oil on mylar mounted on board – 48 x 36 inches

 

 

Crowds

In this current series I’m exploring the theme of crowd behaviour (and group processes). I want to examine this powerful phenomenon that has persisted through history and across cultures, as a scaffold for our making sense of the world, saying what counts, to understand our relation to others. In this series the crowd becomes a metaphor for loss of self, a feeling of belonging and an arena for the expression of our strongest emotions.

I’m less interested in the reasons for a crowd’s assembly or the aftermath of its activity. These paintings concentrate on the moment where, in the life cycle of the crowd, it has reached the point of maximum escalation. Physical contact, pressure, compression come together in the group to create an emergent sense of commonality which, at its most intense, challenges the boundaries of selfhood.

Perhaps it is only in the crowd that people cast off their petty day to day concerns and become subjects of history.

George Lefebvre